Last week the weather in Calgary started to get more spring like. Snow melting, temps moved from 5 degrees Celsius and it hit double-digits on some days. I rode every day, towing the boys in the Chariot. Even got six hours of good quality riding (without Chariot) on the weekend.

Last night, it started snowing again, it's snowing at the moment and it's -6 degrees Celsius. Look through any window and it spells back to indoor riding on the trainer. The snowflakes coming down right now are the size of parachutes!

This morning I booked a flight on points, heading to Las Vegas. Doreen gave me the green light a couple of weeks ago. Charles, a mountain biking friend is up for the adventure, in fact it was his idea. The plan is to rent a minivan and hit a pile of trails in five days; Gooseberry Mesa at Zion National Park and the trails around St George. Mountain biking for five days - no snow, no multiple clothing layers. Mountain biking. Perfect!


Parachute snow

6 comments:

Dawn said...

Yes, snow, snow and yet more snow. Will it ever end? Today's low was -21C. Brrr.
And once again, amazing photos! Haven't visited for a while, too busy, but almost burnt my cookies taking in all the lighting + effects and end results of your labor. Very inspiring.
How much can I really do with my lil' Kodak 5px digital?

Shaun Taylor said...

-21C uhhmmmmmmm, no thanks. Fortunately it's not been that cold here, only -5C at the moment. Still, just make it end...

I wouldn't worry about the Megapixels your camera has to offer, usually the limiting factor with a point and shoot is it's ability to capture motion (kids) and shoot in poor light (in a house) and forget about kids running around in a house, haha. Still, if you make an effort it's possible to get some great images. My suggestion would be to get a flash unit for the camera, if possible, as lighting is so important particularly "kids running around in a house". Start out slow, taking photos of static objects, like a coffee. ;-) Really, who cares how many photos you take, it's free, it's digital. Once you can move beyond the "occasional shooter" mindset and into the "take a lot of photos of a lot of things" mindset you will suddenly start to understand your camera a whole lot better. Ive only had my D200 for about a month and I've blasted off approx 2000 shots and kept maybe 10% of them but my wife thinks I'm kind of picky.

If you take enough photos around your kids, pretty soon they will want you to take a photo of them doing something cool (cool in their opinion) like the image of Evan diving off the couch, he asked me to take it. And I'm ok with him telling me he wants me to take that photo, 'cause it shows me what's important to him and that's important to me. Kinda corny, I know.

Dawn said...

Thanks for the tips. Must confess, I've slacked off in the photo taking department lately. Will try harder. Now when you say flash unit, is that over and above what the camera already has on it? I can adjust the flash setting as well as the shutter speed. But perhaps it is as you say, to just practice a little more to find out what this thing can really do. Off to take some pics!
Cheers!

Shaun Taylor said...

By flash I mean a dedicated flash unit that you will purchase separately from the camera and side on to the camera's hotshoe (on top). The problem with built in flash units is they are underpowered and don't give you the flexibility you need. It creates a remarkable difference. Good reading on this subject is all over the Web but this guy is a good starter...

http://www.planetneil.com/faq/flash-techniques.html

Dawn said...

Thanks for the educational link. Next time we're in the city I may just splurge. If you happen to read the Irish bit on my blog, sorry. It came across a little more snippy than intended. Maybe I'll stick to practice photography instead of writing.

Shaun Taylor said...

I laughed, and replied.